Playing Chicken with Your Calendar

The ever-interesting Brendan Nelson on meeting chicken:

You have a regular meeting in your calendar. It’s with just one other person. Sometimes you have things to talk to them about and sometimes you don’t. But as long as your calendar says you both have to go, you will both go.

The day of the meeting comes round. There are lots of things that need to be done that day. You look at that meeting sitting obstinately in your calendar and think how useful it would be to get that time back.

Inspiration strikes: why not cancel the meeting? A couple of mouse clicks, an automatic notification sent out, a joyously blank calendar. It seems so easy.

But you can’t bring yourself to do it, to cancel a meeting at such short notice. It would make you look disorganised, unprepared. And what about the other person?

More at the link.

Don’t Forget Your Forever Stamps

The price of a first-class US stamp is set to increase from 46 to 49 cents on January 26. Like Cosmo Kramer’s Michigan bottle redemption plan (see below), Allison Schrager and Ritchie King ran the numbers on whether it would be possible to provide from Forever Stamp arbitrage.

Could the scheme make money? Maybe–if you get the timing right and pay low interest on capital:

Assuming we sell all 10 million stamps for the bulk discount price of $0.475 each, our profit will be $150,000. Subtract out the $399 for the distributor database. Let’s also assume we spent the $3,500 for Check Stand Program plus, say, $300 to make the 100 displays for advertising in stores. That gives us $145,801.

If we do manage to shift the stamps in a month, the interest on our debt will be $29,000. That brings our profits to $116,801. Then we’ll return the equity to our shareholders, along with 50% of the profits.

That leaves us with the other 50%: $58,400.50. If you look at that as a profit on the $4.6 million initial outlay, it’s not very much: less than 1.3%. But remember, all that outlay was leveraged. So if you look at it as a return on our investment—$33.25 for shipping—it’s 175,541%.

A Chrome Extension for XKCD Substitutions

This morning’s XKCD had some fun suggestions for replacing key phrases to make news articles more fun:

Regular readers may recall my Doublespeak Chrome extension, which works on the same principle. In short order, I was able to create a new app, XKCDSub, that works the same way: install the extension, and when you click its icon it will open your current page in a new tab with the phrases replaced. Here is an example of the extension in action on Elon Musk’s Wikipedia page:

elon

The code is open source on Github. You can find it in the Chrome webstore here.

The Economics of Movie Popcorn

The Smithsonian’s Food & Think blog recounts a long history of movie theaters’ objections to popcorn. They wanted to be as classy as live theaters. Nickelodeons didn’t have ventilation required for popcorn machines. Moreover, crunchy snacks would have been unwelcome during silent films.

But moviegoers still wanted their popcorn, and street vendors met their demand. This led to signs asking patrons to check their coats and their corn at the theater entrance.

Eventually, movie theater owners realized that if they cut out the middleman, their profits would skyrocket.  For many theaters, the transition to selling snacks helped save them from the crippling Depression. In the mid-1930s, the movie theater business started to go under. “But those that began serving popcorn and other snacks,” Smith explains, “survived.” Take, for example, a Dallas movie theater chain that installed popcorn machines in 80 theaters, but refused to install machines in their five best theaters, which they considered too high class to sell popcorn. In two years, the theaters with popcorn saw their profits soar; the five theaters without popcorn watched their profits go into the red.

Much more here, including how movie theater demand changed the types of popcorn that are grown.

PopcornPortionSizeExample

Popcorn and other concessions are important to theaters because a large percentage of ticket sales (especially during the first couple of weeks after a movie premieres) go to the studio. Recent figures I’ve seen are that concession sales are 80-90 percent profit, whereas in the opening weekend only about 20 percent of the sale price goes to the theater. This means that concessions can make up nearly half the profit for a theater–no wonder they try to keep viewers from bringing in their own refreshments.

Small bags of popcorn have now turned into buckets, perhaps in an effort to justify charging $8-10 rather than the nickel such snacks sold for when “talkies” were new. This transition is covered in the book Why Popcorn Costs So Much at the Movies and an interview with the author is here.

 

Doublespeak: A Chrome App for the Orwellian Web

tl;dr: Doublespeak is a new Chrome web extension that replaces political doublespeak with plain English. It’s open source so you can help expand the dictionary of terms. 

George Orwell is well-known for introducing the terms “newspeak” and “doublethink” in his novel 1984. A portmanteau of the two, doublespeak, is more common in our modern lexicon–and unfortunately, so is the term that it represents. Another of Orwell’s works, “Politics and the English Language,” explains doublespeak using examples that seem almost quaint today (1946):

In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible. Things like the continuance of British rule in India, the Russian purges and deportations, the dropping of the atom bombs on Japan, can indeed be defended, but only by arguments which are too brutal for most people to face, and which do not square with the professed aims of the political parties. Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Defenseless villages are bombarded from the air, the inhabitants driven out into the countryside, the cattle machine-gunned, the huts set on fire with incendiary bullets: this is called pacification.

Although Orwell is gone, the problems he describes are not. If anything, doublespeak has gotten worse in this age of “rendition,” TSA security theater, and PRISM.

Tim Lynch addressed this problem in the context of the War on Terror in 2006:

By corrupting the language, the people who wield power are able to fool the others about their activities and evade responsibility and accountability. Professor William Lutz, author of The New Doublespeak, notes: “Doublespeak is language that pretends to communicate but really doesn’t. It is language that makes the bad seem good, the negative appear positive, the unpleasant appear attractive or at least tolerable. Doublespeak is language that avoids or shifts responsibility, language that is at variance with its real or purported meaning. It is language that conceals or prevents thought; rather than extending thought, doublespeak limits it.”

It is true, of course, that dishonesty has always been a part of the human experience, but doublespeak is a pernicious variation of dishonesty. Doublespeak perverts the basic function of language, which is to facilitate a common understanding between human beings.

1984-posterLynch goes on to list several examples: “stop-loss” orders as a stand-in for conscription, the replacement of warrants by “national security letters,” and the renaming of Guantanamo prisoner suicides as “asymmetrical warfare.”

A–perhaps the–key point of Orwell’s conception of doublespeak is that words have meaning. Although this runs counter to postmodernism, it points out that language is a key front in the battle for ‘hearts and minds.’ Witness the recent discussion between a well-spoken University of Wisconsin student (‘Madiha’) and an on-campus recruiter for the NSA:

NSA RECRUITER 1: I’m focusing on what our foreign intelligence requires of [us], so…you can define ‘adversary’ as [an] enemy and clearly, Germany is not our enemy, but would we have foreign national interest from an intelligence perspective on what’s going on across the globe? Yes, we [would].

MADIHA: So by “adversary”, you actually mean anybody and everybody. There’s nobody, then – by your definition – that is not an adversary. Is that correct?

NSA RECRUITER 1: That is not correct.

Doublespeak has the power of the state behind it, which includes a great deal of technological sophistication. Until recently, I was more optimistic about the power of the internet to oppose conventional sources of political power. Although the recent Snowden revelations have diminished my confidence in technology as a political force, we can still use it as a tool to take back language.

To that end, I have developed a simple tool that you can use to counter doublespeak in your web viewing experience. It known as Doublespeak and is available as a Chrome web extension. Right now it has a small dictionary of three terms that it replaces, but can easily be extended for more. The code is also open-source on Github. When you install the extension, clicking its icon in the browser window will open a duplicate of the current page in a new tab, but with doublespeak terms replaced by their plain English equivalents.

Here are a few examples of the Doublespeak extension at work on these three pages:

Before

Before

After

After

Before

Before

After

After

Before

Before

After

After

Obviously it does not replace the text in images, but I think that makes the last example all the more striking. The extension should respond to titleized words, but some other special cases (e.g. all uppercase) are not handled in the current version (0.1).

If you have suggestions for new additions to the dictionary or other features, please let me know.

Grad Student Gift Ideas

My sister is starting a graduate program this fall, so I wanted to put together a “grad school survival kit” gift basket for her. When I was looking, though, most search results for things like that were put together by gift basket companies and a large number of them include junk food as filler. While junk food can be a great stress reliever, I would not recommend making that the bulk of your gift to a grad student. Instead, consider some of the following gifts that range from practical to fun:

graduation

Podcasts I Like

Apologies for the silence here lately. I have been working on a couple of longer-than-average posts, as well as some fun projects that I will hopefully be able to share with you here soon. Part of the influence in those upcoming posts is from podcasts I have enjoyed. (Readers of the tipping post may have noticed that two of the main references there were to podcasts as well.)

Ben Franklin Koss HeadphonesThus, I thought readers of this blog might enjoy some of my favorites. There are likely some that I have omitted because I listened to all of their episodes some time ago. Below are those that have stood the test of time or that I am listening to currently.

Economics/Social Science

  • Analysis: Half-hour episodes on current events with a social scientific perspective.
  • Data Stories: As you might expect, an audio podcast about data visualization has some weak points. However, this is useful as a who’s-who of the visualization community.
  • Econtalk: My absolute favorite podcast. Each week, Russ Roberts and a guest discuss research or current events using economics as a lens on the world. Sometimes I think Russ is too hard on statistical methods, but every episode is worth a listen.
  • Great Economists: Originally a MOOC from MRUniversity, the audio from this course is now available as a condensed series of podcasts.
  • History of Rome: History’s greatest empire in 170-odd episodes. Although new episodes are no longer being produced, host Mike Duncan has a new project in the pipeline that is expected in September.
  • Loopcast: DC WarKids and their guests discuss national security and international relations.
  • More or Less: Tim Harford takes quantitative headlines and questions them, often finding more than meets the eye.
  • Planet Money: My second-favorite podcast, after Econtalk. The hosts explain current events or applied economics lessons in accessible language with fun examples. A podcast like this focused on politics would immediately become my all-time favorite.
  • Pop-Up Ideas: Another Tim Harford podcast, this one covers big ideas in social science in a short and punchy manner.

Technology

  • Accidental Tech Podcast: Marco Arment, Casey Liss, and John Siracusa discuss Apple and web technology. This podcast originated as outtakes of their casual car show, Neutral. A very enjoyable listen every week.
  • Bitsplitting: Daniel Jalkut  interviews technology professionals, many of them entrepreneurs.
  • CMD+Space: Myke Hurley interviews guests who “do great things.”
  • Giant Robots Smashing into Other Giant Robots: Discussions of software design and development, hosted by Thoughtbot’s Ben Orenstein.
  • Ruby Rogues: Although originally a Ruby-focused program, after over 100 episodes the rogues now delve into other issues including education, cognition, and the politics of software communities.

This is Your Brain on Hunger

hungerIn his book Thinking Fast and SlowDaniel Kahneman describes the brain as made up of two systems. System 1 is fast, emotional, and almost automatic–I think of this as “intuition.” System 2 controls more logical, deliberate processes. There are many factors that can influence which system you use to make a decision (anchoring, availability, substitution, loss aversion, framing, etc.) and Kahneman’s book discusses these. But other environmental factors can influence which system takes over. This post discusses how hunger shifts the balance from System 2 to System 1.

First up is a study on Israeli judges’ parole decisions broken up by time of day by Shai DanzigeraJonathan Levavb, and Liora Avnaim-Pessoa (edited for PNAS  by Kahneman). Here’s the abstract:

Are judicial rulings based solely on laws and facts? Legal formalism holds that judges apply legal reasons to the facts of a case in a rational, mechanical, and deliberative manner. In contrast, legal realists argue that the rational application of legal reasons does not sufficiently explain the decisions of judges and that psychological, political, and social factors influence judicial rulings. We test the common caricature of realism that justice is “what the judge ate for breakfast” in sequential parole decisions made by experienced judges. We record the judges’ two daily food breaks, which result in segmenting the deliberations of the day into three distinct “decision sessions.” We find that the percentage of favorable rulings drops gradually from ≈65% to nearly zero within each decision session and returns abruptly to ≈65% after a break. Our findings suggest that judicial rulings can be swayed by extraneous variables that should have no bearing on legal decisions.

The Economist summarized the paper and produced a graphic with the main takeaway:

israeli-parole-board

The second paper, by Ilona Grunwald-Kadow and coauthors, analyzes the neural behavior of fruit flies when deprived of food (via @tylercowen and @IFLscience). Their results are explained in this press release from the Max Planck Institute:

The results show that the innate flight response to carbon dioxide in fruit flies is controlled by two parallel neural circuits, depending on how satiated the animals are. “If the fly is hungry, it will no longer rely on the ‘direct line’ but will use brain centres to gauge internal and external signals and reach a balanced decision,” explains Grunwald-Kadow. “It is fascinating to see the extent to which metabolic processes and hunger affect the processing systems in the brain,” she adds.

Remember this next time you’re trying to decide between working through lunch or grabbing a bite to eat. Do your body and your neighbors a favor by taking a break.

See also: 

Trade Secrets of Methodologists: A Bibliography

sciencemethWe all know what the scientific method looks like in idealized form. But the first dirty secret is that you don’t actually write a paper that way. In fact, many papers are written almost in reverse, starting with the findings and working backward. Over the weekend @Worse_Reviewer shared some papers that help to convey these secrets and make grad students aware of the tacit knowledge already put to good use by their more senior colleagues. I have obtained ungated links to the papers (or similar versions) wherever available, along with two additional articles via Mike Ward.

Mapping Literal Place Names

Place names are another one of those micro-institutions. They often carry a linguistic legacy indicating some important discoverer, inhabitant, or conqueror. Changes in place names are significant too. (Would Sinatra’s “New Amsterdam, New Amsterdam” have rolled off the tongue nearly as nicely?) As the names accumulate history and new generations become accustomed to them, however, we often lose the literal sense of their meaning. In an effort to help undo that, the Atlas of True Names “reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,of the familiar terms on today’s maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.”

Here are a couple of examples, and there is much more at the link:

sample_us_west

true-names